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How To Save Yourself From A Bad Meeting

We have been overwhelmed with invitations to pointless, vaguely defined and otherwise “bad meetings.”

“We are in the middle of a global epidemic of a terrible new illness known as MAS: Mindless Accept Syndrome.”

The problem isn’t the moderators but an epidemic called “Mindless Accept Syndrome.” This is where staffers reflexively accept every meeting they get invited into.

“Every day, we allow our co-workers…to steal from us. And I’m talking about something far more valuable than office furniture. I’m talking about time.”

Bad meetings should be treated like a “Loss Prevention” issue, a type of theft.  These approved company or organizational events steal your time and productivity.

“Collaboration is key to the success of any enterprise. And a well-run meeting can yield positive, actionable results.”

What you should do:

Clear your calendar of bad meetings by clicking Maybe or Tentative instead of Accept

Follow up with the moderator to clarify meeting goals and your role.

“Next time you get a meeting invitation that doesn’t have a lot of information in it…click the Tentative button! It’s OK, you’re allowed. That’s why it’s there.”

This will improve your time management and encourages moderators to be more thoughtful in how they organize and communicate about meetings.

 


 

How to Save the World (or at Least Yourself) from Bad Meetings Book Cover How to Save the World (or at Least Yourself) from Bad Meetings
TED Conferences LLC
2016
Video
TED
David Grady
Communications Expert In Print Journalism & Public Relations.

 

David Grady is an information security manager who believes that strong communication skills are a necessity in today’s global economy. He has been a print journalist, a “PR guy” and a website producer, and has ghostwritten speeches and magazine articles for Fortune 500 company executives. A mid-life career change brought him into the world of information risk management, where every day he uses his communications experience to transform complex problems into understandable challenges.

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